Four Key Factors Determine Prime and Subcontractor Affiliations

February 24, 2017

Ostensible Subcontractor Rule: SBA OHA Confirms “Four Key Factors” To Avoid

Source: SmallGovCon, Steven Koprince, February 14, 2017

In determining whether a prime contractor and subcontractor are affiliated under the ostensible subcontractor rule, the SBA is supposed to consider the totality of the relationship between the parties.  But when it comes to determining whether the ostensible subcontractor rule has been violated, not all components of the prime/subcontractor relationship are created equal.

In a recent decision, the SBA Office of Hearings and Appeals confirmed that there are “four key factors” that are strongly suggestive of ostensible subcontractor affiliation–especially if the subcontractor will perform a large percentage of the overall contract work.
OHA’s decision in Size Appeal of Charitar Realty, SBA No. SIZ-5806 (2017) involved a GSA solicitation for custodial, landscaping and grounds maintenance at two federal courthouses.  The solicitation was issued as an 8(a) set-aside under NAICS code 561720 (Janitorial Services), with a corresponding $18 million size standard.  The solicitation required, among other things, that offerors provide at least three past performance references, completed over the last three years, for similar work.

After evaluating competitive proposals, the SBA announced that Charitar Realty was the apparent successful offeror.  An unsuccessful competitor then filed a size protest.  Although the size protest was found to be untimely, the SBA believed that the protest raised valid concerns.  The Director of the SBA’s Fresno District Office initiated his own size protest against Charitar.  READ MORE….

Contact your nearest PTAC to learn about the ostensible subcontractor rule and government contracting.


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